IVAO Gander / Shanwick Oceanic


Concorde Controller Procedures


On this page you find many information on how to control Concordes over the North Atlantic.

 1. General Procedures
    1.1 Callsigns
    1.2 Flightplans
2. Oceanic Control Procedures
3. Concorde Tracks for OCMS

 

 

 


1. General Procedures

1.1 Callsigns

Normal procedure is for the word "Concorde" to be inserted between the airline and flightnumber; this draws attention to the fact that the aircraft is a Concorde, and it's special requirements. So, to take the example of the former regular scheduled Concorde Flight BAW001 would have callsign "Speedbird Concorde One".

Note that although Concorde is considered to be 'heavy' this is not used in the callsign; the presence of the word 'Concorde' in the middle of the callsign is sufficient to draw the controller's attention to the special requirements.

1.2 Flightplans

Concorde operates on three specific 'tracks' across the Atlantic Ocean; these are part of the North Atlantic Track system, but unlike the other NAT routes (which change twice daily to take account of the weather that day) they are fixed in position (because Concorde flies above the weather, so the shortest distance is used that keeps Concorde away from land and other traffic). The three NAT routes normally used are:

NAT SM (Sierra Mike) - Normally used for Westbound Concordes
NAT SN (Sierra November) - Normally used for Eastbound Concordes
NAT SO (Sierra Oscar) - Alternative 'overflow' route

Concorde Tracks

Unlike traditional flights which have a fixed cruise level (sometimes with steps up at various points), Concorde can make use of it's exclusive airspace to make a more efficient gradual cruise-climb; this typically begins around FL500, at which point the aircraft climbs only slowly as the fuel is burned-up. Concorde has a maximum operating height of FL600, though it's unusual to get this high before it's time to begin the descent.

The waypoints on each track are:

NAT-SM (Westbound)
SM15W (50.41N 15.00W) , SM20W (50.50N 20.00W) , SM30W (50.30N 30.00W) ,
SM40W (49.16N 40.00W) , SM50W (47.03N 50.00W) , SM53W (46.10N 53.00W) ,
SM60W (44.14N 60.00W) , SM65W (42.46N 65.00W) , SM67W (42.00N 67.00W)

NAT-SN (Eastbound)
SN67W (40.25N 67.00W), SN65W (41.40N 65.00W), SN60W (43.07N 60.00W),
SN52W (45.10N 52.30W), SN50W (45.54N 50.00W), SN40W (48.10N 40.00W),
SN30W (49.26N 30.00W), SN20W (49.49N 20.00W), SN15W (49.41N 15.00W)

NAT-SO (Alternate)
SO15W (48.40N 15.00W) , SO20W (48.48N 20.00W) , SO30W (48.22N 30.00W) ,
SO40W (47.04N 40.00W) , SO50W (44.45N 50.00W) , SO52W (44.10N 52.00W) ,
SO60W (42.00N 60.00W)

Westbound flights will use NAT-SM, Eastbounds NAT-SN and NAT-SO may be used either way.


2. Oceanic Control Procedures

As an Oceanic controller, Concordes should be making position reports just as any other aircraft would, passing each of the SM/SN/SO waypoints. Cave: Travelling at Mach 2 Position Reports will be in 15-20 minute intervals. Owing to fuel limitations, aircraft separation must be achieved by takeoff, as there is no possibility for slow flight or holdings. Ideally this can be achieved by offering the overflow NAT SO to the pilot concerned, if unable, the 2nd concorde must be held at gate until separation is achieved. Concorde flights should be at least 15 minutes apart. Concordes travelling supersonic should have a 50 mile horizontal separation from other Concordes at the same altitude.


3. Concorde Tracks for OCMS

NAT-SM SM15W SM20W SM30W SM40W SM50W SM53W SM60W SM65W SM67W
NAT-SN SN67W SN65W SN60W SN52W SN50W SN40W SN30W SN20W SN15W
NAT-SO SO15W SO20W SO30W SO40W SO50W SO52W SO60W
NAT-SP SP15W, SP20W, SP45N, SP30W, SP40W

 


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